Write a Follow-up Email to Remember

So your networking event went really well. You made met some influential people, nailed your elevator pitch, traded business cards, and ended with a firm, friendly handshake. The next day, it’s time to act on those connections with a follow-up email to your new colleagues. Your second impression is almost just as important at your first. The diction, tone, content, and request of your message will establish who you are electronically to your connection, so it’s important to ensure that you craft a good message. Here’s some handy tips.

Utilize the Subject Line. For busy people, emails with vague subjects from unknown senders often go unread. Subjects like “Hello!” don’t pose a compelling case for being opened and will render your email useless. In order to ensure your message is opened, use the subject line to convince the recipient to open it. Including who you are, the reason for your message, and the action necessary convinces the reader that opening the email is worth his or her time. For example, a subject like, “Sam from Networking Event: Follow-up email and request for coffee” says it all.

Open with a simple greeting. After your salutation, offer a friendly introduction such as, “I hope you’re well,” or if you’re more familiar with the person, extend your wishes to members of their family or office mates.

Offer specific details about your original meeting that indicate that you were listening intently and found the conversation meaningful. If you’ve thought of something you should have said but remembered only after the conversation was over, the follow-up email is a great time to bring it up.

Get to the point. Once you’ve greeted the reader, reminded the reader who you are, and demonstrated that you were invested, make your request quickly and confidently. Don’t apologize for taking up time or waste sentences on justifying why you feel you “deserve” their time. Ask for a phone call or another meeting in another sentence or two, and suggest specific days and times as a starting point for negotiating the appointment.

Wrap it up. Thank your reader and finish the message. There’s no need to drag out the message once you’ve accomplished your mission. Especially on screens, readers and lazy and tend to skim, so big blocks of text beyond the bare essentials will likely go unread and bury the really important points in fluff.

Mind your signature. Besides your name, make sure your signature includes ways for readers to get in contact with you, including a phone number, a linkedin profile page, and maybe even a twitter handle. Give your reader plenty of avenues to reach you or find positive images of you online if they want to do more research about you on their own.

Proofread slowly and carefully. There’s nothing more embarrassing than sending an email with a missing word or a homophone. A well-written email free from typographical errors will convey attention to detail and professionalism.

Once you’re done, send it off! Rather than waiting, stressing, and eventually getting cold feet, go ahead and press send. You’ll feel better once it’s over.